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Phillies revisit decisions on Nix, Schierholtz

Phillies revisit decisions on Nix, Schierholtz

Phillies revisit decisions on Nix, Schierholtz

PHILADELPHIA -- Laynce Nix had never signed a guaranteed big league contract before the Phillies offered him a two-year, $2.5 million deal in Dec. 2011.

The Phillies let Nate Schierholtz go last November after a short stint with the team.

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Both names resurfaced Tuesday when the Phillies designated Nix for assignment with the Cubs in town for a three-game series against the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park.

Schierholtz, who signed with the Cubs, entered the night hitting .268 with 23 doubles, three triples, 14 home runs, 43 RBIs, a .500 slugging percentage and .827 OPS in 337 plate appearances. If he had enough plate appearances to qualify, his slugging percentage would rank fifth among 22 big league right fielders. His OPS would rank seventh. Nix, meanwhile, hit .180 with four doubles, two homers, seven RBIs, a .258 slugging percentage and a .486 OPS in 136 plate appearances.

Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. explained the front office's decision to cut ties with Schierholtz, who missed some time with the Phillies because of a broken foot, and keep Nix.

"Couple reasons why we did it," Amaro said. "We were obviously very left-handed. I guess we didn't get the opportunity to see Schierholtz as much as we would've liked. … A lot of those [two-year deals to bench players], much like the deals you'd give to a middle reliever, they're all kind of crapshoots. But if you want the player, and there's competition to get a player, sometimes you have to go the extra year to get him. But, you know, sometimes you make the right decisions on guys, sometimes you don't."

Added Phillies manager Charlie Manuel: "Nix already had a contract, and Nix was a proven bat off the bench."

Said Schierholtz: "[The injury] totally took away any chance that I had to make an impact here. I think I played 10 games or so before I broke my foot and my toe. Then I missed five weeks or so and then playing sporadically, I didn't have much time to make any impression."

Todd Zolecki is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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