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Amaro: Adams 'doing great' following fall surgery

Reliever had same procedure as Carpenter; Young to be behind schedule at camp

Amaro: Adams 'doing great' following fall surgery play video for Amaro: Adams 'doing great' following fall surgery

PHILADELPHIA -- Phillies fans probably heard the Cardinals announce this week that Chris Carpenter might never pitch again.

Carpenter, 37, had surgery in July to address thoracic outlet syndrome, which involved removing a rib to alleviate pressure on a nerve near his right shoulder. He returned to pitch in September and told reporters last month, "I haven't had any issues with my throwing or anything this year. I feel good. My shoulder feels good."

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But Carpenter suffered a season-ending setback last week, which included the return of numbness and discomfort in the right shoulder and neck area, bruising and discoloration in his right hand.

Those problems are relevant in Philadelphia because setup man Mike Adams, who signed a two-year, $12 million contract in December, had the same surgery in October.

"We've talked to him. He said he's doing great," Phils general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said Thursday. "We'll find out more when he arrives in Clearwater, and I think he'll be arriving there fairly soon. He's been throwing off the mound and he hasn't had any issues. We'll see how far along he is, whether he's going to be behind in Spring Training or not. We don't think so. But we'll find out once he gets to Clearwater. Right now we don't have any concerns, but we obviously want to make sure that he's all right and progressing properly."

It goes without saying the Phillies need Adams healthy. The eighth inning was an issue last season, with the 'pen blowing 13 leads.

But while Amaro acknowledged that signing Adams carried risks, he said this week's news regarding Carpenter did not make him more concerned.

"Everybody's situation is a little different," Amaro said. "All the information we got from our doctor and looking at the medical reports and such we felt ... as always, there's a risk when guys are coming off a surgery like this, but we felt like it was a good risk."

Amaro said outfielder Delmon Young will be the only player in camp definitely behind schedule, although that could change by the time pitchers and catchers have their first official workout Wednesday. Young is recovering from November microfracture surgery on his right ankle.

"He won't be able to get into real activities probably for a few weeks after we open up, at least," Amaro said. "He might not be able to play in games competitively until the middle of March. We don't know that, but we'll see how he progresses once we see him."

Amaro said right-hander Mike Stutes, who had shoulder surgery in June, should be "100 percent, we believe. He shouldn't be any issue at all. He's been throwing [bullpen sessions] for a while."

Left-hander Raul Valdes had right knee surgery in September. Amaro also said he is doing well.

"He'll be close to 100 percent," Amaro said.

Both Stutes and Valdes will be competing for bullpen jobs.

Todd Zolecki is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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