Rollins won't take 'hometown discount' to stay

Rollins won't take 'hometown discount' to stay

PHILADELPHIA -- If this is Jimmy Rollins' final season in Philadelphia, he seems prepared for it.

Rollins has been with the Phillies since they selected him in the second round of the 1996 First-Year Player Draft, but he will become a free agent for the first time following the season. He has said while he has enjoyed his time in Philadelphia, he will not take the proverbial "hometown discount" to remain in red pinstripes.

So this postseason would seem like an excellent opportunity to raise his free-agent profile.

"If that happens, that happens," Rollins said Sunday before Game 2 of the National League Division Series at Citizens Bank Park. "I mean, it can help some, but I am who I am, postseason, regular season, regardless. When free agency comes about, people are going to pay you for what your numbers reflect, not just for a three-week snapshot."

Rollins hit .268 with 22 doubles, two triples, 16 home runs, 63 RBIs, 30 stolen bases and 87 runs scored in 142 games. His .736 on-base-plus-slugging percentage was 25 points below his career average, although it was his best since 2008 (.786). He also ranked 11th out of 20 qualifying shortstops in the big leagues in OPS. But there is no question he remains a consistent force in the lineup and field, and it would be a risk to let him walk.

Rollins said he would like a five-year contract, although it seems unlikely the Phillies would offer him that.

Rollins said he never felt pressure to produce this season, knowing a big year could make him millions.

"It was never really an issue," he said.

If this is it for Rollins, what does he think about his legacy? He is third in franchise history in doubles (388); fourth in hits (1,866), runs (1,080) and stolen bases (373); fifth in games (1,636); 13th in homers (170) and 14th in RBIs (725). He won the 2007 NL Most Valuable Player Award. Many regard him as the greatest shortstop in franchise history.

"As far as my legacy here in Philadelphia?" he said. "It's pretty solid."