Rain thwarts any attempt of comeback vs. Mets

Rain thwarts any attempt of comeback vs. Mets

NEW YORK -- For most of Wednesday night, the Mets and Phillies seemed to be battling the elements as much as they were battling each other. Various amounts of rain fell at Citi Field throughout the Mets' 6-3 win over the Phillies, finally forcing an end to the proceedings in the middle of the sixth.

By that point, the Mets had taken a lead thanks to Travis d'Arnaud's two-run homer and an onslaught of extra-base hits against Phillies starter Nick Pivetta, who gave up six runs in five innings. Pivetta allowed the leadoff man to reach base and score in each of the first three innings.

"I don't think it's anything to panic about," Pivetta said about falling to 5-10 with a 6.49 ERA. "I don't want to panic because I'm young. I hate saying it, but I'm young. There's a lot of good things I can build on. I've proven I can build on a lot of good things. I have a lot of really good guys I can feed off of and I can really learn from which I'm trying to do constantly."

The game moved quickly thanks in large part to Mets starter Robert Gsellman, who threw 62 of his 86 pitches for strikes and called himself "hungry" to maintain a spot in the team's rotation. He also delivered an RBI single.

Gsellman's RBI single

Summoned from Triple-A Las Vegas prior to the game, Gsellman did not allow his first runs until Cesar Hernandez hit an RBI double -- one of his three hits -- and Nick Williams cracked a two-run homer in the sixth.

Hernandez's RBI double

A short time later, umpires suspended play, and eventually called the game.

"The weather and the conditions maybe started to get a little rough," Mets manager Terry Collins said. "But I really thought the command of [Gsellman's] pitches tonight was the best I've seen him this year."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Catching the wave: Earlier this week, d'Arnaud received something of a vote of confidence from Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, who talked openly of keeping the team's catching tandem of d'Arnaud and Kevin Plawecki intact next season. D'Arnaud drove in the Mets' only run Tuesday, then homered to key a three-run first inning Wednesday against Pivetta. It was just d'Arnaud's third opposite-field home run of the season.

"I'm just hitting it where it's pitched, not trying to over-swing," d'Arnaud said. "That's when I think I'm at my best."

Phightin' back: Rain was falling heavily by the time Williams stepped to the plate in the sixth inning with a runner on second base and one out. It didn't seem to affect Williams, who smashed a Gsellman curveball 403 feet to right field to cut the Mets' margin to 6-3.

"I just reacted to that one," Williams said.

Williams' two-run homer

QUOTABLE
"We have not played the fastest games, so I thought we were going to have a tough time getting five in. Certainly, getting the lead early helped. All of the sudden, it was raining pretty good." -- Mets manager Terry Collins, on the teams needing just one hour and 17 minutes to make it an official game

SOUND SMART WITH YOUR FRIENDS
Gsellman's six-inning effort was the Mets' first rain-shortened complete game since Dillon Gee threw a six-inning complete game on Sept. 21, 2013, in Philadelphia.

WHAT'S NEXT
Phillies: The Phillies open a four-game series at 7:05 p.m. ET against the Nationals on Thursday night at Nationals Park. Right-hander Aaron Nola (10-10, 3.72 ERA) makes the start. He is 1-3 with a 7.33 ERA in his past four starts.

Mets: Originally scheduled to start Wednesday before weather concerns interfered, Matt Harvey (4-4, 5.97 ERA) will open the Mets' four-game series Thursday with the Reds at 7:10 p.m. ET. In his return from the disabled list last weekend, Harvey allowed seven runs in two innings in Houston.

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Anthony DiComo has covered the Mets for MLB.com since 2008. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter and listen to his podcast.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.