Phillies shut down Morgan for rest of season

Phillies shut down Morgan for rest of season

ATLANTA -- With 12 games left in their season, the Phillies have decided to shut down starter Adam Morgan for the rest of 2015 in what both the pitcher and the team described as a mutual decision.

Morgan, who missed all of the 2014 season after shoulder surgery, last pitched on Friday in a 2-1 loss to the Braves. The left-hander went six innings in that game, giving up just two runs on six hits without walking a batter. He breezed through the six innings in 70 pitches, but took the loss.

The 25-year-old Atlanta-area native ends the season 5-7 with a 4.48 ERA, with 84 1/3 innings pitched over 15 starts.

After his good outing Friday, interim manager Pete Mackanin and other team officials approached the pitcher to ask about his health and the likelihood of taking another start or two. "He wasn't sure whether he should continue or not," Mackanin said. "Basically, the indecision on his part led us to make that decision."

Morgan says he feels good, and he wondered about bowing out early. "I don't want to come across as someone who just shuts it down," he said.

The deciding factor was trying to get a good head start on 2016.

"The innings that I hope to pitch next year aren't going to be affected by two more starts," Morgan said in the clubhouse Sunday after the Phillies dropped their third straight 2-1 game to the Braves, "whether I make them or not."

Now, the offseason begins for Morgan, who is expected to compete for a top spot in Philadelphia's rotation next season. He'll begin to consult with physicians, trainers and others soon to get a plan.

"I'm excited for all the right reasons. I'm ready to finish this season, get there, start lifting, start woking out, throwing, just to build that arm strength, 'cause I know it's in there," Morgan said. "It's been feeling good. There are no restrictions this offseason. It's getting after it this whole offseason."

John Donovan is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.